Heat’s On Project helps local residents stay warm

Steve Spires, Brian Woltz, Paul Lykins and Ryan Canter. Service technician Stephen Haley, Jr. was unable to participate in this year’s event due to Ohio Air National Guard obligations.

Service Technicians Steve Spires, Brian Woltz, Paul Lykins and Ryan Canter. Service technician Stephen Haley, Jr. was unable to participate in this year’s event due to Ohio Air National Guard obligations.

More than a dozen Jackson residents will stay warm this winter, thanks to the help of some local volunteers.

This past weekend, mechanical service technicians from Geiger Brothers participated in the Heat’s On Project, providing free furnace inspections for low income senior and disabled homeowners.

The four technicians that participated performed preventative maintenance on furnaces and boilers, which ensures they are operating efficiently to keep fuel cost as low as possible. Additionally, heat exchangers and safety controls were inspected and tested to confirm safe operation.

“It’s just our way of showing good will back to the people in the community,” said Brian Woltz, Geiger Brothers’ Service Manager.

The volunteers also inspected smoke detectors in the homes, replacing old batteries and added smoke detectors where needed.

Geiger Brothers would like to thank Callahan’s Do-It Best for donating the furnace filters for the project and West Virginia Electric for donating smoke detectors and batteries.

Geiger Brothers Employees Join Nationwide “Heat’s On” Program

Heat's On Technicians

On November 2, six employees of Geiger Brothers gave up their Saturday morning to make sure local seniors were ready for winter.

This was a Geiger Brothers’ independent entry into the nationwide “Heat’s On” program, which has the goal of checking furnaces of neighbors at risk to ensure that when the snow starts, no one will be left out in the cold.

“Heat’s On” stands for “Handicapped and Elderly Assistance to Service Our Neighbors” and it began in 1986 in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota.  The 2013 program was the 28th carried out annually as the program has spread nationwide.  The free service helps low-income, elderly and disabled homeowners and raises public awareness regarding regular furnace servicing.

Through this program nationwide, union pipefitters have volunteered hundreds of thousands of hours helping these individuals and families prepare for the cold months ahead.  Homeowners are pre-qualified with the help of local community human service organizations.

As the autumn temperatures start to drop, program volunteers make sure these families have working and reliable heat in their homes.  They inspect, clean and service furnaces to make sure they are operating efficiently.

Safety assurance is paramount, as the volunteers monitor carbon-monoxide emissions from the furnaces they service, install and/or check to make sure smoke detectors in the houses are working and replace failing batteries.

Heat's On